kava europe womenCategoriesCulture Basic

Kava Kava: naturally for women

What does Kava Kava give to women and what did women give to Kava?

The Pacific tradition of Kava drinking is more than three thousand years old. Although many regional perceptions of Kava were shaped by myths of a very feminine (or even erotic) nature, access to Kava was generally the domain of men. Nowadays, however, we are discovering that the unique qualities of the piper methysticum are a perfect fit for women. Could it be that history is returning to its roots? Here is the feminine side of Kava Kava!

kava musicCategoriesCulture

KAVA KAVA and MUSIC

Kava Kava and music: musical journey around Fiji

Kava is well known for its enriching effect on the musical experience. It sensitises to sounds and opens up to harmonies. It raises a question, what to listen to for Kava? What does the music of the Pacific islands sound like? Join us on a musical journey around Fiji! Bula Maleya!

CategoriesCulture

Kavaha greets you. BULA!

Bula, friends! The kindest word that is said every now and then in the South Pacific islands. 

BULA is the joy of life, a smile. Nothing expresses a positive attitude towards the surrounding world and people as much as this word. ‘Bula bula’ (pronounced boo-LAH!) is the most popular greeting of the Fijian people.

CategoriesCulture

History, traditions and legends intertwined by Kava roots.

The traditions of drinking Kava goes back three thousand years and probably began on the islands of Vanuatu or Tonga. Then it reached Fiji and other islands, eventually covering almost the entire Pacific. In most regions, Kava’s performance was so highly regarded that it was beginning to shape the local culture.

The ritual of preparation and shared drinking performed many social, political, and religious functions. It was an important part of tribal ceremonies and customs: with Kava, for example, unions were formalized, or conflicts were resolved. It also gained an important role in commemorating holidays and celebrations. Kava was drunk by shamans and rulers, and the bowl was passed on in order to reflect the communal hierarchy.